• Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships
     RRR Diagram
     
    In March 2013, the Central Dauphin School District partnered with the International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE) to adopt the Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships (RRR) framework in an effort to improve student achievement across the district.  The ultimate goal of this initiative is to prepare every student to be college and/or career ready by providing them with relevant instruction.  Since beginning the initiative, teachers have been educated on the principles of the RRR framework and have been implementing the ideals into their daily instruction.
     
    RIGOR at Lawnton

    Academic rigor refers to learning in which students demonstrate a thorough in-depth mastery of challenging tasks to develop cognitive skills through reflective thought, analysis, problem solving, evaluation or creativity. It’s the quality of thinking, not the quantity, that defines academic rigor, and rigorous learning can occur at any school grade and in any subject.

    Question Matrix (Q-Matrix):
    In an effort to increase rigor within the classroom, all teachers utilize the Q-Matrix within their classroom.  The Q-Matrix is a chart with question starters that students can use to formulate their own questions about the information that they have read and/or has been presented to them .
     
    Q-Matrix  
     
     
    CUBES Graphic Organizer
    In an effort to increase rigor within the classroom, all teachers utilize the Q-Matrix within their classroom.  The Q-Matrix is a chart with question starters that students can use to formulate their own questions about the information that they have read and/or has been presented to them .
     
    C - Circle the important numbers
    U - Underline the question
    B - Box the key words and circle the operation sign
    E - Eliminate unnecessary information; write the equation
    S - Solve and explain in writing 
     
    CUBES  
     
     
     
    RELEVANCE at Lawnton:

    Relevance refers to learning in which students apply core knowledge, concepts, or skills, to solve real-world problems. Relevant learning is interdisciplinary and contextual. It is created, for example, through authentic problems or tasks, simulations, service learning, connecting concepts to current issues and teaching others.

    In an effort to make their lessons relevant to their students' lives and interests, teachers administer student interest surveys to every student at the beginning of school year to find out more information about their likes and dislikes.  Doing this allows teachers to incorporate students' interests into classroom lessons and activities. 
     
    RELATIONSHIPS at Lawnton: 

    Rigor without relevance can enable students to be successful in school, but results in failure once they no longer have that structure and guidance. In other words, there are students who do well academically, but who seem to be dysfunctional in the world beyond school because they lack the ability to apply their knowledge to real-life situations.

     The Lawnton Faculty creates a safe and welcoming environment by taking the time to get to know each one of their students as an individual.